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    Wetter Ostsee
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5 standSkeet

 

 Hours of Operation (subject to calendar):

Tuesday

Thursday

11:00am - 3:00pm

6:00pm - 9:00pm

Saturday 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Learn to Shoot  
Friday 6:00pm - 8:00pm

 

 

 Pricing (per round of 25): 

Commitee/Junior members $2.50 round
Members/Junior Non-Members $3.50 round
Non Members $5.00 round

 

 

 

Spring Skeet League

    Wallum Lake Rod and Gun Club Spring Skeet League

    Begins Sunday, April 17, 2016.  Non-members welcome

    250 targets, including 50 targets of trap and 50 targets of 5-stand.

    A fun time! All skill levels welcome!

    Includes "Steak and Clays" awards dinner to be held at Addieville East Farms

    Cost: $80 / Members                  $100 / Non-members

    Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

NSSA Registered Shoots

     April 10, 2016 - "Little Rhody Summer Shoot"

     September, 2016 - "Quahog Classic" 

     October, 2016 -  RISSA Invitational

Fun Shoots

     March 13, 2016 - Green Bird Shoot - "Win a ham!"  

    

Charity Shoots

     October 2, 2016

     John "HAB" Memorial  "Hab-O-Ween" shoot

     Proceeds to benefit the WLRGC Fishing Derby

    

     October 2, 2016

     "Shoot for Hope" skeet shoot and pot-luck dinner

     Proceeds to benefit the non-profit House of Hope and Community Development Corporation (http://thehouseofhopecdc.org)

 Learn to Shoot - Beginners' Skeet- (Flyer)

    Friday evenings 6pm to 8pm

    Contact Norm Fontaine to confirm attendance

     Phone: 401 286-9641

 

Our Skeet

At WallumLake we currently have two NSSA-regulation skeet fields. 

A round of Traditional Skeet consists of 25 shots from 8 different shooting stations, the first seven of which are spaced equidistant around an arc of a circle, and the eighth is half way between Stations 1 and 7, which are located at each end of the arc.  In Traditional Skeet, the path of the target is always the same. Targets are thrown from houses located at each end of the arc, behind Stations 1 and 7.  The high house target starts from a point 10-feet above the ground at Station 1, and the low house target from a point up to 3-feet above the ground at Station 7.  Targets thrown from each house fly over a stake near Station 8, 18 feet outside of an imagined line between the two houses.

Modern Skeet

One field includes vertically oscillating "wobble" skeet throwers, which allows us to present Modern Skeet, a variation on Traditional Skeet.  Modern Skeet format is a somewhat faster format than Traditional Skeet, and adds the element of surprise, as the shooter does not know exactly what height the targets will be presented.  Also different from the Traditional Skeet format, the shooter is presented clay targets "on report", which means that once the first target is fired upon, the second target is immediately released. 

Coming in 2013, we will begin construction of a third regulation skeet field!

 Rules

1   Shotgun action must be open at all times
2   Load and unload gun on station only
3   Only one loaded gun on the skeet field at any time
4   Eye and hearing protection is mandatory for shooters and spectators
5   Shell gauge no larger than 12 gauge, 1 1/8th shot
6   Shell shot size no larger than #7 1/2" or smaller than #9
7   No one under 18 allowed in skeet houses unless supervised by an adult
8   Only one beginner shooter per squad (per discretion of the range officer)
9   By law, no ashooting after 10:00 pm
10    No alcohol consumption before shooting

 History

Skeet differs from all other shooting sports, because it was originally developed to improve hunting in the field, and only later, because of its growing popularity, developed into a competitive sport.

Its development was actually brought about, because of the industrial revolution sweeping the country during the early 1900′s. Rural areas began growing at incredible speed, into large, sprawling, industrial cities.

Hunters were now finding it necessary to travel longer distances in order to find areas in which to hunt. When they finally arrived, they discovered the game was no longer as plentiful as it once was. Not only were hunters having a harder time finding game, but certain species had already been hunted into extinction. One example is the carrier pigeon.

The American Sportsman soon began to realize, some form of game conservation would have to be enacted. Eventually, it was, with game seasons, and bag limits, imposed on all hunters. Because of the shortened hunting season, hunters were now finding it harder and harder to get enough practice to become a decent shot.

Some hunters turned to trap shooting to fine tune their hunting abilities. However, this was no help because of the lack of incoming and crossing shots.

In 1920, this problem was finally addressed by Charles Davis of Andover Mass. He was the owner of a dog kennel and an avid hunter. He spent many hours trying to devise a way to improve his field shooting. After trying and discarding many different types of plans he finally settled on an idea based on a field, laid out in a 50 yard circle. He called it “Shooting Around the Clock.”

Around the circle, he placed 12 shooting stations, with a single trap, located at station 12. Shooters would fire two shots from each station, and one from the center, equaling a box of shells, or 25 shots. This layout provided almost every type of shot a hunter would encounter in the field.

All went well, until the owner of the adjoining property complained of falling shot on his land. To avoid any future problems, Davis cut his shooting circle in half, and put a second trap at the opposite end of his shooting field. This became the birth of the modern day skeet field.

This hunting practice field became so popular; it soon developed into a popular shooting game. Eventually, it was renamed Skeet, which is the Scandinavian word for Shoot. In 1926, the first National Skeet Championships were held, and shortly after, the National Skeet Shooting Association was formed.

 

Members can check out guns from the main office to shoot skeet.

 

For more information contact:

Gary Rumrill
401 230-4101 g.rumrill@ew-inc

 

Rule Book

nssa

 


Wallum Lake Rod & Gun Club ♦ 200 Brook Rd. ♦ Harrisville, RI ♦ Skeet Chairman: Paul Castellone ♦ 401-465-9861

 

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